NAB 2019 – Post-Production World

          

NABShow 2019

The National Association of Broadcasters is the voice for the nation’s radio and television broadcasters. As the premier trade association for broadcasters, NAB advances the interests of our members in federal government, industry and public affairs; improves the quality and profitability of broadcasting; encourages content and technology innovation; and spotlights the important and unique ways stations serve their communities.

NAB delivers value to our members through advocacy, education and innovation.

FMC Training’s Post-Production World

The world’s leading training event for content creators and designers including TV, film and video editors, producers, directors, graphic artists, motion graphics designers and new media specialists.

Produced in partnership with Future Media Concepts, the six-day program features a robust multi-track schedule focused on production and post-production technologies, trends and workflows.

UAVs UnLeashed – Produced with Sundance Media Group

Stay tuned for a full NAB /PPW schedule.  We ARE confirmed for our pre-show PRACTICAL workshops!

Friday, April 5:  UAV Aerial Cinematography Techniques Field Workshop

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, April 6:  Night UAV Flight Workshop

Show registration has various price points. Please check their website for current pricing.
By | April 6th, 2019|0 Comments

sUAS Roadshow – Quad City Metro Area – Iowa

REGISTER HEREs

WestWind Unmanned and Sundance Media Group have partnered together to showcase sUAS (small Unmanned Aerial Systems) in Public Safety. This unique roadshow is designed to educate agencies (law enforcement, fire, EMS, and other first responders) on the value of a turnkey drone program and how implementing drones into the workflow can decrease costs and personnel risks and increase efficiencies. This free introduction to “sUAS as a Tool” will showcase the Yuneec H520 hexacopter and the DataPilot mapping program, the new Autel EVO as well as other accessories and technologies that create a turnkey sUAS solution for a variety of public safety applications.

  • Search and Rescue
  • Accident Reconstruction
  • Crime Scene Mapping
  • Crowd Control
  • Active Shooter Scenarios
  • Intelligence-gathering
  • Photographing Remote Crash Sites
  • Airborne communication Repeater Platforms
  • Terrain Mapping
  • Crash/Disaster Site Monitoring
  • Enhance Safety at a Contaminated Scene
  • Fire Scene Management Tools with Thermal Imaging & Resource Management
  • Value of a birdseye view of operations on a large scene

Our presenters will also showcase Brother AirScouter SystemFoxFury Lighting SolutionsVenom Power, and Hoodman USA accessories.

Join us for a two hour presentation and a flight demonstration.

Seating is limited, so please register early.

If you have any questions about the roadshow or its location, please email rsvp@sundancemediagroup.com.

Be sure to bring all your drone / UAV / sUAS questions with you!

Aerial Overview

Fire & H520

By | March 15th, 2019|0 Comments

sUAS Roadshow – Chicago, Il

REGISTER HERE

WestWind Unmanned and Sundance Media Group have partnered together to showcase sUAS (small Unmanned Aerial Systems) in Public Safety. This unique roadshow is designed to educate agencies (law enforcement, fire, EMS, and other first responders) on the value of a turnkey drone program and how implementing drones into the workflow can decrease costs and personnel risks and increase efficiencies. This free introduction to “sUAS as a Tool” will showcase the Yuneec H520 hexacopter and the DataPilot mapping program, the new Autel EVO as well as other accessories and technologies that create a turnkey sUAS solution for a variety of public safety applications.

  • Search and Rescue
  • Accident Reconstruction
  • Crime Scene Mapping
  • Crowd Control
  • Active Shooter Scenarios
  • Intelligence-gathering
  • Photographing Remote Crash Sites
  • Airborne communication Repeater Platforms
  • Terrain Mapping
  • Crash/Disaster Site Monitoring
  • Enhance Safety at a Contaminated Scene
  • Fire Scene Management Tools with Thermal Imaging & Resource Management
  • Value of a birdseye view of operations on a large scene

Our presenters will also showcase Brother AirScouter SystemFoxFury Lighting SolutionsVenom Power, and Hoodman USA accessories.

Join us for a two hour presentation and a flight demonstration.

Seating is limited, so please register early.

If you have any questions about the roadshow or its location, please email rsvp@sundancemediagroup.com.

Be sure to bring all your drone / UAV / sUAS questions with you!

Aerial Overview

Fire & H520

By | March 14th, 2019|0 Comments

CompTIA Communities & Councils Forum (CCF)

March 11, 2019 – March 13, 2019

CHICAGO, IL

Join us for our second annual CompTIA Communities & Councils Forum (CompTIA CCF).  New this year, CCF has been expanded to include members of CompTIA’s five Industry Advisory Councils, in addition to our seven U.S. Communities.  The objective of CompTIA CCF is to further the discussion and exploration of some of the most pressing issues and opportunities in the tech industry today and for members of the industry to formulate and collaborate on 2019 member initiatives that will have a positive impact on their market spaces.  Book your stay with us today and,

•             Participate in impactful, productive peer-to-peer meetings.

•             Network with top industry leaders.

•             Learn about the newest disruptive technologies.

•             Gain insightful thought-leadership.

•             Contribute to impactful industry initiatives.

•             Experience high level networking across multiple tech sectors.

Don’t miss this opportunity to engage with members of CompTIA’s communities including Emerging Technology, Advancing Women in Technology, Advancing Diversity in Technology, Technology Lifecycle Services, Future Leaders, IT Security, Managed Services, and members of our Industry Advisory Councils including Blockchain, Business Applications, Drones, Smart Cities and the Channel Advisory Board.

Event Dates: Monday, March 11 – Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Location: Chicago Marriott Downtown
540 North Michigan Ave.
Chicago, Illinois 60611
(312) 836-0100
Room Rate: $170 plus tax

Reservation Cutoff Date: Monday, March 4th. Please be aware the room block may fill before that date.

AGENDA and PRICING

Who Should Attend?
This event is suitable for both the highly engaged member, and those new to CompTIA, and is a great way to connect with and leverage your industry trade association.

Contact:
Please contact Jaime Little at JLittle@comptia.org with any questions.

REGISTER NOW

By | February 28th, 2019|0 Comments

Update? Calibrate!

Software and firmware run the world of UAS, and some developer/manufacturers offer/require frequent updates. Updates are a component of the maintenance process for any UAS and should be manually checked at minimum, every 30 days. We recommend that any old software/firmware versions be archived if possible, in the event of problems encountered with a new update. Rolling back software is a good option (when possible).  In addition to archiving old software/firmware versions (when possible), it is required by the FAA that any maintenance be logged. This includes logging any software/firmware updates to the aircraft system.

For many UAS pilots/operators, the process ends at the update. In fact, many updates occur in-field with automated software updates being required by some manufacturer/developers, so the pilot uses WiFi or cellular connection to update the aircraft, controller, software, or battery, just before flying the next mission. There have been many instances where the next action with the aircraft is to begin the planned mission.

This is a mistake.

Any time software or firmware on the aircraft, tablet, battery, IMU, or other component of the aircraft is implemented, it is recommended that the aircraft be re-calibrated. This step is frequently put aside in interests of time, and can result in disaster.

The issue this pilot had could have been avoided had the aircraft and system been recalibrated prior to flight. The aircraft is a total loss due to compass error.

Software/Firmware updates are not always reliable and in some cases, result in safety issues. Recalibration is an important step in mitigating risk due to unknown factors generated via the software/firmware update process.  Compass, accelerometer, etc all must be recalibrated. It is also a good idea to let the aircraft sit for a few minutes after powering up, to acquire all satellites prior to flight after a recalibration.

Take 5 to avoid issues. Calibrate after every software/firmware update, and log the calibration along with the notice of update/firmware changelog.  Your flights will be more safe and confident.

 

By | November 27th, 2018|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Update? Calibrate!

Global Security Exchange (GSX – formerly ASIS) 2018

Global Security Exchange (GSX), formerly the Annual Seminar and Exhibits, presents a growing focus on an international audience coming together to share ideas, explore options, and invest in solutions.  If you are looking to implement a drone program within your organization, need to hire a drone-as-a-service company to augment security, or are concerned about how to counter the threat of rogue operators—GSX 2018 is the place for you!

VIEW THE FLOOR PLAN

Why Global Security Exchange?

GSX continues to be the most respected and comprehensive event in the industry. In fact, the show has grown 12% in the number of exhibiting companies over the past three years—and 2018 will be no different. We’re tracking 4% ahead of last year, with prime exhibit space going fast!

GSX offers expanded opportunities for exhibitors to engage buyers on the show floor with exclusive show-only hours, lunches and happy hour, enhanced learning theaters, Innovative Product Awards, Career Center programming and a new Career Fair, plus a new, immersive learning format on the X Stage!

It’s a global community. More than 21% of buyers are from outside the U.S. and that number is projected to grow, thanks to the International Buyer Program, which recognizes the importance of GSX to the security industry worldwide.

GSX hosts the most highly anticipated, industry-supported networking events around! There’s no better place to build relationships with the global security community and advance your brand than at the Opening Night Celebration and President’s Reception—and exhibitors receive a free allotment of tickets, providing unparalleled access.

It’s powered by ASIS International. Tens of thousands of security professionals worldwide rely on ASIS for trusted, vetted information, insights, and peer support. GSX is their go-to destination for networking, education, and marketplace solutions.

There’s nothing else like it in the world. Join these leading solution providers and be a part of the most influential and innovative marketplace in the security industry.

gsx-Expo-Only-button.png

Be sure to visit the Sundance Media Group booth:  5413 and have a walk through of the AVOC.

By | September 23rd, 2018|0 Comments

UAVs in Public Safety – H520 Roadshow – Williamsport, PA

WestWind and Sundance Media Group have partnered together to showcase UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) in Public Safety. This unique roadshow is designed to educate agencies (law enforcement, fire, EMS, and other first responders) on the value of a turnkey drone program and how implementing drones into the workflow can decrease costs and personnel risks and increase efficiencies. This free introduction to “UAV as a Tool” will showcase the new Yuneec H520 hexacopter and the DataPilot mapping program, as well as other accessories and technologies that create a turnkey UAV solution for a variety of public safety applications.

  • Search and Rescue
  • Accident Reconstruction
  • Crime Scene Mapping
  • Crowd Control
  • Active Shooter Scenarios
  • Intelligence-gathering
  • Photographing Remote Crash Sites
  • Airborne communication Repeater Platforms
  • Terrain Mapping
  • Crash/Disaster Site Monitoring
  • Enhance Safety at a Contaminated Scene
  • Fire Scene Management Tools with Thermal Imaging & Resource Management
  • Value of a birdseye view of operations on a large scene

Our presenters will also showcase FoxFury Lighting SolutionsHoverFlyVenom Power,  and Hoodman USA accessories.

Join us for a two hour presentation, light snacks and beverages.

If you have any questions about the roadshow or its location, please email rsvp@sundancemediagroup.com.

REGISTER HERE

Be sure to bring all your drone / UAV / sUAS questions with you!

Fire & H520

By | September 19th, 2018|0 Comments

Part 91, 101, 103, 105, 107, 137: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

All these FARs, what’s a drone pilot to do in order to understand them? Do they matter?

YES!

In virtually every aviation pursuit except for sUAS, an understanding of regulations is requisite and part of most testing mechanisms.  As a result, many sUAS pilots holding 

a Remote Pilot Certificate under Part §107 are woefully uninformed, to the detriment of the industry.

Therefore, sUAS pilots would be well-served to inform themselves of how each section of relevant FARs regulate components of aviation.

Let’s start by digging into the intent of each Part.

  • §Part 91 regulates General Operating and Flight Rules.
  • §Part 101 regulates Moored Balloons, Kites, Amateur Rockets, Unmanned Free Balloons, and some types of Model Aircraft.
  • §Public Law Section 336 regulates hobby drones as an addendum to Part 101.
  • §Part 103 regulates Ultra-Light Vehicles, or manned, unpowered aviation.
  • §Part 105 regulates Skydiving.
  • §Part 107 regulates sUAS
  • §Part 137 regulates agricultural aircraft

RELEVANT PARTS (Chapters):

Part §91

This portion of the FARs is barely recognized, although certain sections of Part 91 may come into play in the event of an action by the FAA against an sUAS pilot. For example, the most concerning portion of Part 91 is  91.13, or “Careless or Reckless Operation.” Nearly every action taken against sUAS pilots have included a charge of 91.13 in the past (prior to 107).

Specific to drone actions, The vast majority of individuals charged have also included the specific of a 91.13 charge.

sUAS pilots whether recreational or commercial pilots may be charged with a §91.13 or the more relevant §107.23 (reckless)

It’s pretty simple; if there are consequences to a pilot’s choices and actions, it’s likely those consequences also included a disregard for safety or planning, ergo; careless/reckless. The FAA has recently initiated actions against Masih Mozayan for flying his aircraft near a helicopter and taking no avoidance action. They’ve also taken action against Vyacheslav Tantashov for his actions that resulted in damage to a military helicopter (without seeing the actual action, it’s a reasonable assumption that the action will be a §91.13 or a §107.23 (hazardous operation).

Other parts of Part 91 are relevant as well. For example;

  • §91.1   Applicability.

(a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), (e), and (f) of this section and §§91.701 and 91.703, this part prescribes rules governing the operation of aircraft within the United States, including the waters within 3 nautical miles of the U.S. coast.

The above paragraph includes sUAS.  Additionally, Part 107 does not exclude Part 91. Airmen (including sUAS pilots) should be aware of the freedoms and restrictions granted in Part 91.

§91.3   Responsibility and authority of the pilot in command.

(a) The pilot in command of an aircraft is directly responsible for, and is the final authority as to, the operation of that aircraft.

(b) In an in-flight emergency requiring immediate action, the pilot in command may deviate from any rule of this part to the extent required to meet that emergency.

(c) Each pilot in command who deviates from a rule under paragraph (b) of this section shall, upon the request of the Administrator, send a written report of that deviation to the Administrator.

§91.7   Civil aircraft airworthiness.

(a) No person may operate a civil aircraft unless it is in an airworthy condition.

(b) The pilot in command of a civil aircraft is responsible for determining whether that aircraft is in condition for safe flight. The pilot in command shall discontinue the flight when unairworthy mechanical, electrical, or structural conditions occur.

§91.15   Dropping objects.

No pilot in command of a civil aircraft may allow any object to be dropped from that aircraft in flight that creates a hazard to persons or property. However, this section does not prohibit the dropping of any object if reasonable precautions are taken to avoid injury or damage to persons or property.

§91.17   Alcohol or drugs.

(a) No person may act or attempt to act as a crewmember of a civil aircraft—

(1) Within 8 hours after the consumption of any alcoholic beverage;

(2) While under the influence of alcohol;

(3) While using any drug that affects the person’s faculties in any way contrary to safety; or

Sound familiar?

SubPart B also carries relevant information/regulation with regard to operation in controlled airspace, operations in areas under TFR ((§91.133), operations in disaster/hazard areas, flights during national events, lighting (§91.209)

PART 101

Part §101 has a few applicable sections.

Subpart (a) under §101.1 restricts model aircraft and tethered aircraft (balloons). Although subpart (a.4. iiv) is applicable to balloon tethers, there is argument that it also applies to sUAS. Subpart (a.5.iii) defines recreational flight for sUAS/model aircraft.

 

Finally, §101.7 re-emphasizes §91.15 with regard to dropping objects (may not be performed without taking precautions to prevent injury or damage to persons or property).  Public Law 112-95 Section 336 (which may be folded into a “107 lite” version), clarifies sections not added to Part 101.

Bear in mind that unless the pilot follows the rules and guidelines of a NCBO such as the AMA, AND the requirements of that NCBO are met, the flight requirements default to Part 107 requirements.

PART §103

Part §103 regulates Ultralight vehicles (Non powered, manned aviation)

Although no component of Part §103 specifically regulates UAV, it’s a good read as Part 103 contains components of regulation found in Part 107.

PART §105

Part §105 regulates Skydiving.

Part §105 carries no specific regulation to sUAS, an understanding of Part 105 provides great insight to components of Part 107. Part 107 has very few “new” components; most of its components are clipped out of other FAR sections.

PART §107

Although many sUAS pilots “have their 107,” very few have actually absorbed the FAR beyond a rapid read-through. Without a thorough understanding of the FAR, it’s difficult to comprehend the foundation of many rules.

PART §137

Part 137 applies specifically to spraying crops via aerial vehicles.

Those looking into crop spraying via sUAS should be familiar with Part 137, particularly with the limitations on who can fly, where they can fly, and how crops may be sprayed.
One area every ag drone pilot should look at is §137.35 §137.55 regarding limitations and business licenses.

The bottom line is that the more informed a pilot is, the better pilot they can be.  While there are many online experts purporting deep knowledge of aviation regulations and how they specifically apply to sUAS, very few are familiar with the regulations in specific, and even less informed as to how those regulations are interpreted and enforced by ASI’s. We’ve even had Part 61 pilots insist that the FSDO is a “who” and not a “what/where.” Even fewer are aware of an ASI and how they relate to the world of sUAS.

FSIM Volume 16

It is reasonably safe to say that most sUAS pilots are entirely unaware of the Flight Standards Information Management System, aka “FSIMS.” I’ve yet to run across a 107 pilot familiar with the FSIMS, and recently was vehemently informed that “there is nothing beyond FAR Part 107 relative to sUAS. Au contraire…

Familiarity with the FSIMS may enlighten sUAS operator/pilots in how the FAA examines, investigates, and enforces relevant FARs.

Chapter 1 Sections 1, 2  and 4 are a brief, but important read, as is Chapter 2, Section 2.

Chapter 3 Section 1 is informational for those looking to apply for their RPC Part 107 Certificate.

Chapter 4 Sections 2, 5, 7, 8 are of particular value for commercial pilots operating under Part 107.

Volume 17, although related only to manned aviation, also has components related to 107, and should be read through (Chapters 3 & 4) by 107 pilots who want to be informed.

Gaining new information is always beneficial, and even better if the new information is implemented in your workflow and program. Become informed, be the best pilot you can be, and encourage others to recognize the value in being a true professional, informed and aware.

 

 

By | September 13th, 2018|Construction, Drone, Drone Safety, Inspection, Night Flight, Public Safety, Real Estate, Regulations, sUAS, sUAS, sUAS Regulation, sUAS Safety, Training, UAV, UAV Maintenance, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Part 91, 101, 103, 105, 107, 137: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

Night (Drone) CSI Demonstration/training with FoxFury

Brought to you by: &

 

FoxFury, Sundance Media Group, and public safety personnel will demonstrate how to achieve scene capture in the dark, with a drone, capable of 2D and 3D mapping and modelling.
These same techniques may be applied to virtually any type of night scene capture.

A known crime scene has been recreated and will be flown with both night-vision and standard RGB cameras to demonstrate the viability of wide-variety of non-specialized cameras in dark crime scene capture environments.

Pix4D Fields (a new product) will be demonstrated live on-site, for rapid verification of image capture and area integrity.

Pizza will be served; please register so that everyone attending will have access.

**The event is .8 miles east of the actual address, at the trailhead parking lot (has no specific address)
GPS coordinates: 36°00’46.3″N 114°55’23.2″W

Cameras are permitted. Please; no photography during drone flights.

 

By | September 6th, 2018|0 Comments

Plan your UAV Flight for Inspiring Eclipse photos!

Yuneec Typhoon H near Red Rock Canyon
Yuneec Typhoon H near Red Rock Canyon

2017 brings an opportunity of a total solar eclipse, a rare and exciting event. In recent times, the only place to view a full eclipse has been unpractical as being in remote areas or on the ocean have been the only viewpoints of quality. This year is much different!

cation in the USA is in the central corridor, but that doesn’t mean you won’t be able to see the eclipse in your area.   Learn more about the eclipse, its path, and what to expect from here. Sundance Media Group will be in Hopkinsville, Kentucky where there will be 2 minutes and 40 seconds of totality where the day will become almost as dark as night!

Capturing the sun with the moon overlaid will not be very practical with a drone. Simply put, a very small lens system with a wide angle (as most drones offer) will record only a tiny dot in the sky, and this is why long, telephoto lenses are required for proper direct capture of the eclipse.

However, the shadow of the moon passing over the earth is as dramatic as the eclipse itself, and a drone is ideal for this sort of image capture. Still images, time lapse images, or video can all be very exciting when captured from altitude.

Capturing the movement of the moon shadow over the earth will be very dramatic, and quite easy to capture with most any drone. We recommend the Yuneec Tornado, Typhoon H, or Q500 with the CGO‐series cameras.

To capture the eclipse properly, an ND filter is required. If capturing over water, an ND64 is recommended. If capturing over land, an ND16 will suffice. PolarPro and Freewell both manufacture ND filters for use on the CGO3+ camera.

The Neutral Density (ND) filter will slow down the camera’s shutter, allowing for smooth movement of the shadow, while also reducing the dynamic range, providing for clearer contrast and deeper color.

A wide open area is preferable. Being as high on a hill or other elevation with an unobstructed view is also extremely desireable. Altitude is the best way to capture the dramatic movement of the shadow.

With regulations preventing altitudes of over 400’, larger areas and hilltops are very important for the best recording of the experience. The extremely wide‐angle of the CGO3+ camera system will help capture a broader perspective, giving the shadow a very dramatic flair as it moves across the curvature of the earth.

The key to ensuring you capture the images you want is PLANNING your flight.  Safety is paramount as it is likely there will be many curious eclipse observers. You will want to ensure that where you are flying is legal and safe. Here are a few planning tips:

■   Ensure your UAV, controller and camera current on software/firmware updates

■   Scout the area you plan on flying; Check the airspace you plan to fly.

  • File a NOTAM, or “Notice To Airmen.” Dependent on the desired airspace, hobby users can electronically request ownership of a particular area above them at an altitude of higher than 400’. Requesting a NOTAM costs nothing, and is a good safety measure, particularly in areas where helicopters and fixed wing aircraft may be flying.

■     Pre-Plan the steps of your flight to ensure you capture your footage!

  • Practice the angles!
  • Between today and the eclipse, fly the drone to high elevations/altitudes to find the best camera angle at the best times of day for your eclipse view.

Take note of the sun’s location, proximate objects in the foreground, and identify (and write down) the best camera angle that shows more earth than sky. Keep only the horizon in the upper portion of the frame during this time.

Plan on allowing the drone to hover with no movement. The eclipse shadow will move quickly; approximately 2 minutes of totality in the central areas of the US; being prepared is important.

What you DO NOT want to do is spend an entire eclipse event messing around with your settings, or viewing it entirely through your remote/ground station. PRACTICE these angles so that you are able to naturally observe the phenomenon of the eclipse with your eyes (covered by protective eyewear, of course).

Although the small Yuneec Breeze is not recommended for high altitude flight, if you’re in an area where a hilltop and few obstructions exist, the Breeze may also be used. While there are no filters available for the Breeze, Neutral Density gel is available at any theatrical supply, and may be taped in place over the camera lens during this rare, exciting event.

Take caution to not point the camera lens of any camera system directly at the sun without proper MD filtration. It is very likely the intensity of the sun will burn the imager hardware of the camera, permanently damaging it.  Eclipse sunglasses are recommended as well. Here are are a few more eclipse safety tips to know about.

Above all else, practice standard UAV flight safety techniques. Avoid flying over persons, property, or animals, stay within required altitude limits, and keep a watchful eye on the drone during the 2 minutes of the total eclipse.

As we mentioned, SMG will be in Hopkinsville, KY to experience the “path of totality”. If you are in the area, be sure to register with the area organizers and drop by to say “hi”!

Fly Safe and capture some inspiring images! Be sure to drop by our Facebook page and share with us!

By | August 17th, 2017|Drone, Drone Safety, Regulations, sUAS Regulation, sUAS Safety, Training, UAV|Comments Off on Plan your UAV Flight for Inspiring Eclipse photos!