Pix4D Training (Las Vegas December 2019)

Description

Pix4D software allows users that do not possess specialized GIS-grade equipment to rapidly create relatively accurate models. This Pix4Dmapper workshop focused on an sUAS (drone) capture workflow, will introduce key Pix4Dmapper workflows and output.  This two-day session will showcase optimal camera settings, flight planning techniques, MTP identification, placement, safety considerations, and application-specific best practices.  Ultimately, you will learn how to best capturing RGB images and creating, managing, analyzing, and sharing 2D and 3D representations of reality.  A series of hands-on exercises will demonstrate how to effectively work with the Pix4Dmapper solution.

Expect some time in the field as we will put aircraft up and capture images/data from a local scene, and then stitch the data together in the classroom to best demonstrate best practices and procedures for optimal Pix4D output and delivery.

Attendees bring their own computers, and we’ll provide the Pix4D licenses for the duration of the training.

Please do not bring your own drone, we will have one for use with the class.

 

Objectives

  • sUAS setup for producing data for stitching
  • Produce accurate 2D and 3D georeferenced representations of reality, including orthomosaics and 3D models
  • Acquire accurate measurements
  • Using Manual Tie Points/MTP  and Ground Control Points (GCPs) for great accuracy
  • Share your deliverables with stakeholders

Agenda

  1. Introduction
  2. Multi-ray photogrammetry
  3. Collecting ground control points
  4. Planning a drone flight with the Pix4Dcapture mobile application
  5. Creating, processing, and measuring in a Pix4Dmapper Desktop project
  6. Creating, processing, and measuring in a Pix4Dmapper Cloud project
  7. Sharing Pix4Dmapper Desktop and Pix4Dmapper Cloud deliverables

 

This is a two-day workshop.

By | December 19th, 2019|0 Comments

IS THE UAS INDUSTRY PREPARED FOR 8K? DO WE WANT 8K?

In 2004, Sony released the world’s first low-cost HD camera, known as the HVR-Z1U. The camera featured a standard 1/3” imager, squeezing 1440×1080 pixels (anamorphic/non-square) pixels on to the sensor. This was also the world’s first pro-sumer camera using the MPEG2 compression scheme, with a color sample of 4:2:0, and using a GOP method of frame progression, this new technology set the stage for much higher resolutions and eventually, greater frame rates.

It’s “father,” was the CineAlta HDWF900, which offered three 2/3” CCDs, which was the industry standard for filmmaking for several years, capturing big hits such as the “Star Wars Prequel Trilogy”, “Once Upon a Time in Mexico”, “Real Steel”, “Tomorrowland”, “Avatar”, “Spykids” (1 & 2), and so many others.  The newer HDV format spawned from similar technology found in the HDWF900, and set the stage for extremely high end camera tech to trickle down into the pro-sumer space.

Overtime, camera engineers identified methods of co-siting more pixels on small imagers, binning pixels, or using other techniques to increase the capture resolution on small surfaces. Compression engineers have developed new compression schemes which brought forward AVC (h.263), MP4(h.264), and now HEVC/High Efficiency Video Codec(h.265), and still others soon to be revealed. 

Which brings us to the present.

We have to roughly quadruple megapixels to double resolution, so the jump from SD to HD makes sense, while the jump from HD to UHD/4K makes even more sense. Following that theme, jumping to 6K makes sense, while jumping to 8K is perfect theory, and nears the maximum of the human eye’s ability to resolve information.

At NAB 2018, Sony and Blackmagic Design both revealed 8K cameras and in that time frame others have followed suit.

During CommUAV and InterDrone, several folks asked for my opinion on 6 and 8K resolutions. Nearly all were shocked as I expressed enthusiasm for the format.

    “It’s impossible to edit.”

    “The files are huge.”

    “No computer can manage it.”

    “There is no where to show 8K footage.”

    “Human eyes can’t resolve that resolution unless sitting very far away from the screen.”

    “Data cards aren’t fast enough.”

And….so on.

These are all the same comments heard as we predicted the tempo of the camera industry transitioning from SD to HD, and from HD to 4K.  In other words, we’ve been here before.

Video cameras are acquisition devices. For the same reasons major motion pictures are acquired at the highest possible resolutions, and for the same reasons photographers get very excited as resolutions on-camera increase, so should UAS photographers. Greater resolution doesn’t always mean higher grade images. Nor does larger sensor sizes increase quality of images. On the whole, higher resolution systems usually does translate into higher quality images.

Sensor sizes are somewhat important to this discussion, yet not entirely critical. The camera industry has been packing more and more pixels into the same physical space for nearly two decades, without the feared increase in noise. Additionally, better noise-sampling/reduction algorithms, particularly from OEM’s like Sony and Ambarella, have allowed far greater reduction in noise compared to the past. Cameras such as the Sony A7RIV and earlier offer nearly noise-free ISO of 32,000!

Sensor sizes vary of course, but we’ll find most UAS utilize the 1/2.3, or the 1” sensor. (Light Blue and Turquoise sizes respectively, as seen below). 


“Imagine an UAS equipped with an 8K camera inspecting a communications tower. Resolution is high, so small specs of rust, pitting, spalling, or other damage which might be missed with lower resolutions or the human eye become apparent with a greater resolution.”


Why Does Higher Resolution Translate to a Superior Finished Product?

Generally, we’re downsampling video or photos to smaller delivery vehicles, for but one reason. In broadcast, 4:2:2 uncompressed color schemes were the grail (no longer). Yet, most UAS cameras capture a 4:2:0 color sample.  However, a 4K capture, downsampled to 1080 at delivery, offers videographers the same “grail” color schema of 4:2:2!

As we move into 6 or 8K, similar results occur. We gain the ability to crop for post editing/delivery to recompose images without fear of losing resolution. This means that although the aircraft may shoot a wide shot, the image may be recomposed to a tighter image in post, so long as the delivery is smaller than the source/acquisition capture. For example, shooting 4K for 1080 delivery means that up to 75% of the image may be cropped without resolution loss.

 

As the image above demonstrates, it’s quite possible to edit 8K HEVC streams on a newer laptop. Performance is not optimal without a great deal of RAM and a good video card, as HEVC requires a fair amount of horsepower to decode. The greater point, is that we can edit images with deep recomposition. Moreover, we have more pixels to work with, providing greater color correction, color timing, and depth/saturation.

For public safety, this is priceless. An 8K capture provides great ability to zoom/crop deeply into a scene and deliver much greater detail in HD or 4K delivery.

The same can be said for inspections, construction progress reports, etc. Users can capture at a high resolution and deliver in a lower resolution.

Another benefit of 6 and 8K resolutions is the increase in dynamic range. While small sensors only provide a small increase in dynamic range, a small increase is preferable to no increase. 

To address other statements about 6K and 8K resolutions; They human eye has the ability to see around 40megapixels, age-dependent. 8K is approximately 33megapixels. However, the human eye doesn’t see equal resolutions across the surface. The center of our eye sees approximately 8megapixels, where the outer edges are not as deep. High resolution does provide greater smoothing across the spectrum, therefore our eyes see smoother moving pictures.

BEYOND THE HUMAN EYE

Going well-beyond the human eye, higher resolutions are applicable to “computer vision,” benefiting mapping, 3D modeling, and other similar applications. Generally speaking, more pixels equals greater smoothness and geometry. As technology moves deeper into Artificial Intelligence, higher resolutions with more efficient codecs become yet even more important. Imagine an UAS equipped with an 8K camera inspecting a communications tower. Resolution is high, so small specs of rust or other damage which might be missed with lower resolutions or the human eye become more visible with a greater resolution. Now imagine that greater resolution providing input to an AI-aided inspection report that might notify the operator or manager of any problem. Our technology is moving beyond the resolution of the human eye for good reason.

DATA STORAGE

Files from a 6 or 8K camera are relatively small, particularly when compared to uncompressed 8K content (9.62TB per hour). Compression formats, known as “Codecs” have been improving for years, steadily moving forward. For example, when compressions first debuted in physical form, we saw Hollywood movies delivered on DVD. Then we saw HD delivered on Blu-ray. Disc formats are dead, but now we’ve moved through MPG2, AVC, AVCHD, H.264, and now H.265/HEVC. In the near future we’ll see yet even more compression schemes benefitting our workflows. VVC or “Versatile Video Codec” will be the next big thing in codecs for 8K, scheduled to launch early 2022.

Unconventional h.264 and H.265/HEVC are currently being used as delivery codecs for compressed 6 and 8K streams. 8K has been successfully broadcast (in testing environments) at rates as low as 35Mbps for VOD, while NHK has set the standard at 100Mbps for conventional delivery.

Using these codecs, downconverting streams to view OTA/Over The Air to tablets, smartphones, or ground station controllers is already possible.  It’s unlikely we’ll see 8K streaming from the UAS to the GSC. 

U3 Datacards are certainly prepared for 6 and 8K resolutions/datastreams; compression is what makes this possible.  The KenDao 8K and Insta 8K 360 cameras both are recording to U3 cards available in the market today.

It will be some time before the average consumer will be seeing 8K on screens in their homes. However, 8K delivered for advertising, trying to match large format footage being shot on Weapon, Monstro, Helium or other camera formats may be less time-consuming when using 8K, even from a smaller camera format carried on an UAS (these cameras may easily be carried on heavy-lift UAS).

Professional UAS pilots will benefit greatly from 5, 6, or 8K cameras, and should not be shy about testing the format. Yes, it’s yet another paradigm shift in an always-fluid era of aerial and visual technology.  There can be no doubt that these higher resolutions provide higher quality in any final product. Be prepared; 2020 is the year of 5, 6, and 8K cameras on the flying tripods we’re using for our professional and personal endeavors, and I for one, am looking forward to it with great enthusiasm.

 

*Want to know more about codecs, compression/decompression, optimizing capture and data for streaming, or a greater understanding of how to create the best visual images without all the hype and mystery? Ask about training and classes in “Cracking the Camera Code” seminars found online, in our training facility, or in your offices.

 

By | November 25th, 2019|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Practical Night UAV Flight Training (Post-Commercial UAV Expo 2019)

About the Workshop

Sundance Media Group (SMG) will offer practical Night UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, otherwise known as drone) flight training course to equip UAV pilots with the knowledge, skills and confidence to pilot your UAV at night safely, efficiently and effectively.

Greater than 70 percent of our flying information comes through the eye and the eye is easily fooled at night. This is compounded by the inexperienced pilot alternating views between a tabled/lighted display and the position of the UAV in the sky. Night flying has a higher accident rate than identical day flying, both in UAV and manned aviation. Why? Depth perception is severely distorted, as is reaction time. There are also visual illusions that need to be recognized and mitigated. This session will provide information that will allow pilots to sidestep these challenges, while properly assessing and managing the risks associated with night flight (as waived per Part 107.29). You’ll also learn the foundation of applying for a COW/COA for night flight from an experienced night-flight pilot

Theoretical Training (2 hours)

The workshop will begin with a comprehensive theory session classroom style, then we head out to the night flight location for some practical experience. Topics to be covered during the classroom portion: 

  • FAA rules of night UAV flight  (What is a 107.29 waiver?)
  • Different types of visual illusions that commonly occur at night
  • Autokinesis and night landing Illusions and how to avoid them
  • Equipment setup
  • Risk Mitigation
  • Importance of acclimating your eye for night flight & avoid light contamination
  • Foundation of applying for a COW/COA for night flight from an experienced night-flight pilot

This workshop is designed to provide all the necessary information needed to empower pilots to sidestep these challenges, while properly assessing and managing the risks associated with night flight (as waived per Part 107.29).  *This workshop includes a certificate of night flight training, which can be used to expedite your FAA waiver.

After a comprehensive theory session, we will travel to the nearby night flight location for some practical experience. We’ll present different types of visual illusions that commonly occur at night. In this practical hands-on class, we will discuss visual illusions as well as best practices for night flying. We will cover Autokinesis and Night Landing Illusions and how to avoid them. We will also discuss acclimating your eye for night flight. We will also cover the use of lights to illuminate our subjects and how to avoid “light contamination” in our eyes.

  • Practical Flight Training (2 hours)  (In the field!)
    • Overview of pre-planning checklist
      • Outline for the day
      • Wind Speed/weather check
      • Location overview: On-site walkthrough of potential obstacles/issues
      • Safety & Emergency procedures (requirement of aircraft lighting)
      • Equipment check, site setup, and basic flight controls
    • Overview of Night Flight UAV flight requirements
      • Airspace & notification requirements
      • Communication with ground crew and Visual Observer
    • UAV Night Flight with craft of choice

Registration with this workshop includes:

 

*The certificate of night flight training, which can be used to expedite your FAA waiver.

Please note:  UAVs outfitted with required FAA lighting systems will be provided for the attendees to fly for this workshop. Please do not bring your personal UAV as we will not be able to fly it during this workshop.

Participants should have some drone flight experience prior to taking this workshop.  A 107 certification is recommended.

Schedule

  • Theoretical Class (including test & marking):  1:30 – 4:00 pm
  • Dinner 4:30 pm
  • FIELD 5:30 pm
  • SUNSET 5:47 pm
  • FLYING 6:20 pm – 8:20 pm

FAQS

How can I contact the organizer with any questions?

Please do:  Contact us at workshops@sundancemediagroup.com

What’s the refund policy?

Full refunds offered with 48 hours notice.

Do I have to bring my printed ticket to the event?

No, just ID.

Is my registration fee or ticket transferable?

Tickets are non-transferable.  Please cancel and re-register.

 

Thank you to our supporting organizations:

 

 

By | October 30th, 2019|0 Comments

Sundance Media Group at Commercial UAV Expo 2019

Save $100 on your conference pass with this discount code:   SAVE100CB

 

Commercial UAV Expo is North America’s leading trade show and conference for the commercial drone market, focusing on:

  • Surveying & Mapping
  • Civil Infrastructure
  • Process, Power & Utilities
  • Aggregates & Mining
  • Construction
  • Law Enforcement, Emergency Response & Search and Rescue (SAR)
  • Precision Agriculture

In the Conference Program, UAV industry experts share key insights into the issues asset owners face when implementing unmanned aerial systems (UAS), including systems selection and integration; developing enterprise workflows, guidelines and policies; data management and integration; and legal, safety and regulatory considerations. Plenary sessions and panels cover topics of interest to all end-users regardless of industry, while breakout sessions focus on UAV technology, applications and opportunities in the vertical markets listed above.

The international Exhibition includes drone airframe manufacturers, component and sensor manufacturers, software developers and service companies. Commercial UAV Expo has more exhibitors than any other commercial drone show.

 

Drop by our booth #1119  and say hello while you are at CommUAV2019!

We will have our AVOC on display along with products from Autel Drones, Digital Aerolus, DT Research, QYSEA FiFish, FoxFury, Pix4D, UASideKick, and Venom.  We will also have our friends from Westwind Unmanned in the booth with us, so please do stop in and get a tour!

 

By | October 28th, 2019|0 Comments

HIGH-INTENSITY SPOTLIGHT FOR AEE MACH™ 4 sUAS

## PRESS RELEASE ##

CONTACT INFORMATION:

AEE USA

Mike Kahn

Mike Kahn mkahn@aee.com

858.349.5246

RELEASE DATE:  10.24.2019

 

HIGH-INTENSITY SPOTLIGHT FOR AEE MACH™ 4 sUAS

 Transformative lighting for unmanned aircraft now available

 

 Dateline: [Las Vegas NV 10.25.2019] — Powered by FoxFury, AEE announces a 4-degree spotlight created for the AEE Mach™ 4 aircraft, providing users with a lighting system similar to helicopter-mounted spotlighting systems.

“This new lighting system powered by FoxFury is far beyond anything currently available in the unmanned industry,” said

Mike Kahn, CMO-AEE. “We are excited at the power, battery life, and the unmatched intensity of this new focused spotlight system.”

The 5000 lumen, 790 gram light is built from 6061-T6 aluminum with an IPX7 rating, and offers three intensities and a strobe function. The AEE Mach™ 4 aircraft is capable of approximately 30 minute flight with the spotlight powered by the airframe power supply due to high power efficiency.

“Our intent is to re-create the experience of a helicopter-mounted spotlight while taking into consideration the payload and power capability of an sUAS system” said Mario Cugini of FoxFury. “AEE is the first sUAS system to deploy this platform-agnostic spotlight product designed for virtually any midsized sUAS.”

The AEE Mach™ 4 sUAS system is manufactured for Public Safety, EMS, and inspection purposes, priced at $6499 with a standard 4K camera and $7499.00 with a 10X optical zoom camera. The Spotlight system is $799.00. The AEE Mach™ 4 is a point-to-point secure system with a military-grade ground station control, offering long flight time and/or heavy payload capability with retractable landing gear and

Douglas Spotted Eagle (Sundance Media Group) Director of Education says “Currently there is no product from any manufacturer which offers the intensity, battery life, and viability of in-air scene lighting for public safety, night inspection, or security purposes. We have had opportunity to beta-test this system and are exceptionally impressed with the Mach™ 4 platform carrying the FoxFury Spotlight. The focus, distance/intensity, ultra-efficient battery consumption, and heat dissipation goes well beyond anything we’ve seen in the unmanned industry.”

The AEE platform and FoxFury lighting system may be seen in action at CommUAV Expo in Las Vegas, Nevada on October 29/30, and during the Night Flight programming from Sundance Media Group in the same week.

 

About AEE

AEE Aviation Technology Ltd., has been a leader in developing and manufacturing professional, advanced and reliable recording equipment since 1999. This includes UAV drone systems, action cameras such as the MagicCam and police recording equipment. A pioneer in combining wireless audio and video transmission as well as image and processing and intelligent control technologies, AEE products are proudly distributed worldwide in more than 55 countries and regions across major retail chain outlets. AEE Aviation Technology, Ltd., is based in Shenzhen, China with offices in Munich, Germany and Walnut, California, USA.

 

About FoxFury

Since 2003, FoxFury leads the world in cutting edge LED lighting solutions for enterprise use. The FoxFury Xtremium™ products focus on durability and speed, providing unique solutions and possibilities for first responders, unmanned pilots, enterprise professionals, and videographers in over 65 countries, distributed through the world’s largest distribution centers. FoxFury is a proud US company, with offices in Oceanside, CA.

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By | October 25th, 2019|Counter UAS, Drone, Drone Safety, Inspection, Law Enforcement, Night Flight, Public Safety, Real Estate, Regulations, Security, sUAS, sUAS Regulation, sUAS Safety, UAV, UAV Maintenance|Comments Off on HIGH-INTENSITY SPOTLIGHT FOR AEE MACH™ 4 sUAS

NAB NY 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Why come to NAB Show New York?

“Attending NAB Show (New York) brings awareness and appreciation for how changes in technology drive platform decisions regarding new projects anticipating a world audience particularly in news gathering.”

 

Shoot to post training.

A two-day training event featuring a variety of training for intermediate-to-advanced level users including film, TV and video editors, motion graphics designers, colorists and producers.

By | October 16th, 2019|0 Comments

Pix4D User Conference (Denver, CO)

Be part of it

Join other Pix4D users, drone enthusiasts and GIS-perts in Denver for two days of talking about tech that’s changing the world. There’s a lineup of user stories, new products to explore, and some of the most interesting people around – your peers.
Get inspired
From data acquisition to integration with third party software, learn from other users and Pix4D product experts. Share best practices that will help bring your drone program to the next level.

Map the future together

Disrupt industries, digitalize reality, and define new boundaries. Meet the latest products in our software suite and chat to Pix4D developers and team members about what you would like to see next.

The tie point

Meet industry professionals with the same passion for all things mapping-related. Over coffee, at lunch and at the evening networking event, start the conversation.

By | October 2nd, 2019|0 Comments

Agriculture UAV Training and Spray Drone Demo

Sundance Media Group has partnered with HTS Ag to bring sUAS (small Unmanned Aerial Systems) training in Agriculture to the Midwest. Join us for this unique training session designed to educate on the value of a turn-key drone program and how implementing drones can decrease costs while increasing efficiencies. HTS Ag is subsidizing this event to help share this important information with farmers within driving distance to HTS Ag.  (Typically this training session would be ~$250; your cost to join us is only $20 per seat for training and lunch!)s

Following lunch, the team will be offering demonstrations of several different types of UAVs, including demos from the Rantizo crop spraying drone.

REGISTER EARLY AS SEATS ARE LIMITED!

 

Don’t miss this chance to learn from nationally recognized experts on UAVs. Seating is limited!

Additionally, all registration fees can be applied to future purchases from HTS Ag for the rest of 2019.

 

MANY thanks to: 

By | September 24th, 2019|0 Comments

Public Safety UAV Training and Night CSI Demo

Sundance Media Group has partnered with HTS Ag to bring sUAS (small Unmanned Aerial Systems) training in Public Safety to the Midwest. This unique training is designed to educate agencies (law enforcement, fire, EMS, and other first responders) on the value of a turn-key drone program and how implementing drones into the workflow can decrease costs and personnel risks, while increasing efficiencies. HTS Ag is subsidizing a good portion of the cost of the training (regular price $250), making your investment $35 per seat for training and dinner.

REGISTER EARLY AS SEATS ARE LIMITED!

Following dinner, the team will setup a mock crime scene investigation, by creating a homicide scene. The purpose of this demonstration is to showcase how drones (UAVs / sUAS) are used to capture forensic evidence at the scene, in the dark, and use the data captured to create a map in 2D and 3D for law enforcement use.

Don’t miss this chance to learn from nationally recognized experts on UAVs in Public Safety. Seating is limited!

Additionally, all registration fees can be applied to future purchases from HTS Ag for the rest of 2019.

 

 

 

Many thanks to:

By | September 23rd, 2019|0 Comments

TechGo Expo – Technology on the Beat

TKK Electronics Inc., a Milwaukee-based provider of rugged computers, vehicle docks, mounts and mobile broadband data solutions, announced the sixth annual Technology on the Go (TechGo) Expo will take place at 838 S. 2nd St. in Milwaukee, Wisc. on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019.

Attendance to TechGo is free to first responders, professionals in security, IT and facilities management and members of state and local law enforcement agencies. TechGo Expo gives public and private entities a hands-on introduction to new rugged mobile technologies directly from the manufacturer.

Attendees at TechGo will learn about enforcement and investigative tools; cameras, warning systems and emergency connectivity; advancements in network communication, telecommunication and cyber threat detection; and ways to ensure business continuity, data security and compliance.

Featured speakers include: Christian Ross, public safety for Synnex GovSolv; Dan Lambert, senior product manager for ZincFive; Douglas Spotted Eagle, director/education for Nevada Drone Center of Excellence (sponsored by Sundance Media Group, FoxFury and Autel); Mike Gambrell, public safety program manager for SYNNEX GovSolv; and Tracy Johnson, senior director of business development for ZincFive.

Visit www.tkkelectronics.com/techgo-attendees to learn more. Registration is recommended as space is limited.

 

With thanks to:

      AND     

 

By | September 19th, 2019|0 Comments